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Botany

Mission: To provide affordable, accessible, and exceptional education that fosters student success

Term:  Spring 2018

Course:    BOT 1114   General Botany

Delivery Format:  Traditional

Instructor Information:

Name:  Brook Wiersig

Email:  bwiersig@carlalbert.edu

Office Location:  RC 304

Preferred Contact Method:   e-mail

Office Phone:  647-1417

Office Hours:  As posted

 

Textbook 1 Information: Required                                       

Introductory Plant Biology, 13th Edition.  Stern, Kinsley R. 978-0073369440

Textbook 2 Information: Required

Notes Packet at the Bookstore

 

Course Description:

        Designed for students with majors and minors in biological science, this course presents the major concepts of biology and its processes as illustrated by the living plant. 3 hours

theory, 2 hours laboratory.

Credit Hours:  4.00

 

General Education Outcomes:

Demonstrate knowledge-

·        Demonstration of knowledge results from the appraisal of knowledge and practice of core concepts through analytical, practical, or creative means.  Students shall assemble evidence; identify, categorize, and distinguish among ideas, concepts, and theories; and relate and analyze the significant uses of the gathered knowledge.

Think Critically-

·        Critical thinking encompasses the abilities to identify, categorize, synthesize, and distinguish ideas, concepts, theories, and approaches.  The presentation, explanation, and analysis of skills acquired in academic settings allows examination of competing hypotheses and non-academic events in light of acquired knowledge, and relates the implications of cultural and social perspectives.

Communicate Effectively-

·        Effective communication results from the presentation and expression of concepts encountered in an academic setting in a clear, error-free manner both verbally and in written explanation.  Critical aspects are the clear expression of competing hypotheses, and perspectives in response to material read, analyzed, or presented in both academic and non-academic settings.

Practice Global and Civil Awareness-

·        Practicing global and civil awareness creates the ability to understand both the student’s own civic and cultural background, as well as that of others.  This results from the evaluation of historical and contemporary positions on values, practices, assumptions, and predispositions.  Encouraging active community participation and cognizance provides insight and expands students’ perspectives and awareness.

 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLO’s):

SLO 1. Upon completion of the course students will be able to summarize basic concepts of science, ecology and life as they relate to botany.
-Students will be able to list the attributes of living organisms.
-Students will be able to define matter and describe its basic state.
-Students will be able to describe the features of compounds, acids, bases, and salts.
-Students will be able to describe the various forms of energy.
-Students will be able to list the chemical elements found in cells.
-Students will be able to describe the main properties and functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids.

SLO 2. Upon completion of the course students will be able to explain the structure and function of the major chemical components in relation to plants.
-Students will be able to list the attributes of living organisms.
-Students will be able to define matter and describe its basic state.
-Students will be able to list the characteristics of water and define adhesion and cohesion.
-Students will be able to describe the features of compounds, acids, bases, and salts.
-Students will be able to describe the various forms of energy.
-Students will be able to list the chemical elements found in cells.
-Students will be able to decribe the main properties and functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids.

SLO 3. Upon completion of the course students will be able to determine the structure and functioning of plants at the cellular and tissue level.
-Students will be able to differentiate prokaryote and eukaryote cells.
-Students will be able to  match the function to the following cell structures and organelles: plasma membrane, nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, ribosomes, dictyosomes, plastids, mitochondria, vacuoles, and cytoskeleton.
-Students will be able to describe what takes place during the four phases of mitosis.
-Students will be able to list and describe plant meristems and where they are found.
-Students will be able to state the difference between simple tissues and complex tissues and provide examples of each.
-Students will be able to describe three types of simple tissues and where they may be found in the plant.
-Students will be able to explain structural and functional differences between xylem and phloem.
-Students will be able to provide the structure and function of the epidermis and periderm, as well as secretory tissue.

SLO 4. Upon completion of the course students will be able to verify the internal and external anatomy of stems as related to the functioning plant as a whole.
-Students will be able to name the tissues the develop from shoot apices and the meristems from which various tissue types are derived.  State the differences between primary tissues and secondary tissues.
-Students will be able to list and describe the function of each of the following: vascular cambium, cork cambium, node, internode, axil, bud.
-Students will be able to describe the differences in the development of dicot and monocot stems.
-Students will be able to describe the composition of wood and its annual rings, sapwood, heartwood, and bark.
-Students will be able to provide descriptions, functions and examples of rhizomes, stolons, tubers, bulbs, corms, cladophylls, and tendrils.
-Students will be able to list at least ten human uses of wood and stems in general.

SLO 5. Upon completion of the course students will be able to verify the internal and external anatomy of roots as related to the functioning plant as a whole.
-Students will be able to state the primary functions and forms of roots.
-Students will be able to describe the root regions, including the root cap, region of cell division, region of cell elongation, and region of maturation (including root hairs and all tissues) and list the function of each.
-Students will be able to provide the specific functions of the endodermis and pericycle.
-Students will be able to state the differences among the various types of specialized roots.
-Students will be able to list at least ten practical human uses of roots.

SLO 6. Upon completion of the course students will be able to verify the internal and external anatomy of leaves as related to the functioning plant as a whole.
-Students will be able to identify the external forms and parts of leaves, and explain the functions of a typical leaf and the specific tissues and cells that contribute to those functions.
-Students will be able to describe the differences among pinnate, palmate, and dichotomous venation, and the differences between simple and compound leaves.
-Students will be able to describe the differences among tendrils, spines, storage leaves, flower-pot leaves, window leaves, reproductive leaves, floral leaves, and different types of insect-trapping leaves.
-Students will be able to explain why deciduous leaves turn various colors in the fall and how such leaves are shed.
-Students will be able to list at least fifteen uses of leaves by humans.

SLO 7. Upon completion of the course students will be able to verify the internal and external anatomy of flowers, fruits and seeds in relation to the functioning plant as a whole.
-Students will be able to list the parts of a typical flower and describe the function of each part.
-Students will be able to state the features that distinguish monocots from dicots.
-Students will be able to describe the difference between a fruit and a vegetable.
-Students will be able to identify the regions of mature fruits.
-Students will be able to state five types of fleshy and dry fruits and explain how simple, aggregate, and multiple fruits are derived from the flowers.
-Students will be able to describe fruit and seed adaptations that are used to promote how they are dispersed.
-Students will be able to diagram and label a mature dicot seed (e.g., bean) and a monocot seed (e.g., corn) in section to show the parts and regions.

SLO 8. Upon completion of the course students will be able to compare and contrast the reactions of plant metabolism, including photosynthesis, cellular respiration, and fermentation.
-Students will be able to identify the roles of the important molecules involved in plant metabolism.
-Students will be able to write the generalized equations of photosynthesis and respiration.
-Students will be able to explain what occurs in the light-dependent and light-independent reactions of photosynthesis and list the principal products of the reactions.
-Students will be able to explain what occurs in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, and electron transport during respiration.
-Students will be able to state the differences between aerobic respiration and fermentation.

SLO 9. Upon completion of the course students will be able to explain the process of meiosis and relate it to the alternation of generations plant life cycle.
-Students will be able to recognize the arrangement of chromosomes for the phases of meiosis and briefly describe what occurs in each of them.
-Students will be able to describe the features that meiosis and mitosis have in common and how they differ.
-Students will be able to explain the significance of crossing-over to genetic recombination.
-Students will be able to explain the difference between n and 2n as they relate to plant life cycles.
-Students will be able to, in alternation of generations, indicate at what point each of the following occurs: a change from n to 2n; a change from 2n to n; initiation of the gametophyte generation.
-Students will be able to diagram the life cycle of a flowering plant, indicating shifts from haploid to diploid cells, and vice versa.

SLO 10. Upon completion of the course students will be able to generalize the features of members of the Protista, Fungi, and Plant Kingdoms and life cycles of representatives.
-Students will be able to describe features that the members of Kingdom Protista share with one another and note the basic ways in which they differ.
-Students will be able to discuss the general features that distinguish Kingdom Fungi from the other kingdoms.
-Students will be able to explain how lichens are classified and identified.
-Students will be able to list the features that distinguish the Plant Kingdom from other kingdoms.
-Students will be able to explain how bryophytes as a group differ from other plants.
-Students will be able to describe the basic structural differences between bryophytes and vascular plants.
-Students will be able to list the four phyla of gymnosperms and provide distinguishing features and examples of each phylum.



Evaluation/Assessment Practices

 

Assignments and Course Format:

 

The general format of the class will be lecture, discussion and student participation, and group investigation in the lab. The student will be responsible for reading the assigned topics before class and for participation in class discussion and activities.  Students are responsible for all outside assignments made! DO NOT work on your review questions during class!! Review questions are most useful and helpful when used outside of class to begin learning and assessing your understanding of the material.

 

Grade Scale:

 

Average               Letter Grade                       To Figure Overall Average:

90% and above A                                             Exam Average X .75

80%-89%               B                                         +   Lab Average X .25          

70%-79%               C                                                         Final Average

60%-69%               D

59% and below  F

 

Grading Policies:

 

A total of four or five major examinations will be given during the semester for the lecture section of the class. Exams may include multiple choice, matching, and possibly labeling sections. Each exam will be a sectional test covering material that has been lectured over since the previous exam. Lecture tests will make up 75% of the total grade and lab will make up 25%.  The lowest lecture exam may be dropped.

All assignments must be turned in on the due date.  Assignments not received on time will not receive a full score. All students are responsible for making sure assignments are turned in on time.

Students are expected to take tests at the time they are scheduled.  A student that cannot make the exam at the time it is scheduled must contact the instructor prior to missing the test to be able to make that exam up.  Arrangements can be made for "special" occasions which are under the discretion of the instructor. All tests must be made up within one week of when the test was given.  No curve or bonus will be given on any make-up exam. Lab tests or lab assignments will not be made up.

 

 

Attendance:You are expected to be in class every time we meet.

A student is also responsible for all class work covered during his/her absence from class, even in classes in which he/she is able to satisfy the instructor that the absence was unavoidable.

Failure to attend class regularly may result in a recommendation for the student to withdraw from class or from College. Students who cease attending a class but do not withdraw from that class will receive a grade of F for the course. Attendance will be taken in each class at Carl Albert State College each time that class meets

Additional Course Information:

SUPPLIES: Scantrons, #2 lead pencils, colored pencils or pens, paper

STUDENT CONDUCT:

1.         Tardiness: Tardiness (being late for the beginning of class) is severely frowned upon.  Class officially begins at the posted time (and according to instructor's clock).  If a student is not present at roll (which is taken at every class meeting), that student is counted as late, which can affect participation points if given. Students are expected to arrive in class on time. 

2.         Class Materials: Students are responsible for bringing necessary materials to class. Do not ask me to provide you with notes if you forget them. You are also responsible for bringing something to write with, extra paper, etc., and scantrons and pencils on test days.

3.         Cell Phones:  If you check your phone during a test, I will assume you are using it to cheat and you will receive a zero for that test.

4.    Laptops, Ipads, Headphones, Ipods, etc: Should not be used or out during class.

5.    RESPECT!! Please show respect for your instructor, fellow students and your college.

a.     Do not talk while the instructor or another student is speaking.

b.     Do not distract other students while they are trying to listen and learn.

c.     Put trash in the trash can. DO NOT put trash in the sinks, drawers, or cabinets of the desks.

d.     Do not write on or vandalize desks, chairs or any other school property.

 


 

Spring 2018 TENTATIVE schedule:

Date

Lecture (Chapters)

Exam

Labs

1/16-19

Syllabus and Intro, Ch.1

 

Safety

1/22-26

2-life

 

Microscope

1/29-2/2

3-cells

 

Cells

2-5-9

3, review

 

1: Ch.1-3

mitosis

2/12-16

3-Mitosis, 4- Tissues

 

Tissues

2/19-23

4, 11-growth

 

Leafless twig ID

2/26-3/2

6-stems, 5-roots

 

Roots

3/5-9

7-leaves

2: 3-6, 11

Leaves

3/12-16

8-flowers

 

Flowers

3/19-23

Spring break

 

No lab

3/26-30

Meiosis, 8-fruits

 

Fruits

4/2-6

8-seeds

 

Metabolism

4/9-13

Review; photosynthesis

3: 7-8

Hike at Outback park

4/16-20

10-photosynthesis

 

Presentations

4/23-27

10-respiration

4: 10 ??

Presentations

4/30-5/4

18-Protista, 19- Fungi

 

Field Trip/ Presentations

5/7-11

20-23: Plant Kingdom

 

Make-up time if needed

5/14-18

Finals

Final: 10,18-23

No labs finals week

 

 

 

 

Holidays and Breaks: Spring Break 3/19-23; Easter Break 3/29-30

 

Subpages (1): Botany resources
ĉ
Brook Wiersig,
Jan 12, 2018, 11:26 AM
ĉ
Brook Wiersig,
Jan 18, 2018, 7:14 AM
ĉ
Brook Wiersig,
Jan 12, 2018, 11:24 AM
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