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Microbiology

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Mission: To provide affordable, accessible, and exceptional education that fosters student success


Term:   Spring 2018
Course:    BIO 2155
   Microbiology
Delivery Format:  Traditional

Instructor Information:

Name:  Brook Wiersig
Email:  bwiersig@carlalbert.edu
Office Location:  RC304
Preferred Contact Method:   e-mail
Office Phone:  647-1417
Office Hours:  As posted
 

Textbook 1 Information: Required                                         
Microbiology: An Introduction, 11th ed.  Tortora, Gerald J., B. R. Funke, and Christine L. Case. 978-0321733603

Textbook 2 Information: Required
Microbiology: Laboratory Theory & Application, Brief Edition. Leboffe, Michael J., Pierce, Burton, E. 0895829479

Textbook 3 Information: Required
Notes Packet from Carl Albert Book Store
 

Course Description:
           
This course is an introduction to the study of microbes and includes their biochemical,
environmental, medical, and social importance. Laboratory study is concerned with
morphology, biochemistry, utilization, and control of microorganisms. Lecture 3 hours.
Laboratory 4 hours.

Credit Hours:  5.00
Prerequisites:  4 hours Biological Science, Chemistry 1115.

General Education Outcomes:

Demonstrate knowledge-

Demonstration of knowledge results from the appraisal of knowledge and practice of core concepts through analytical, practical, or creative means.  Students shall assemble evidence; identify, categorize, and distinguish among ideas, concepts, and theories; and relate and analyze the significant uses of the gathered knowledge.

Think Critically-

Critical thinking encompasses the abilities to identify, categorize, synthesize, and distinguish ideas, concepts, theories, and approaches.  The presentation, explanation, and analysis of skills acquired in academic settings allows examination of competing hypotheses and non-academic events in light of acquired knowledge, and relates the implications of cultural and social perspectives.

Communicate Effectively-

Effective communication results from the presentation and expression of concepts encountered in an academic setting in a clear, error-free manner both verbally and in written explanation.  Critical aspects are the clear expression of competing hypotheses, and perspectives in response to material read, analyzed, or presented in both academic and non-academic settings.

Practice Global and Civil Awareness-

Practicing global and civil awareness creates the ability to understand both the student’s own civic and cultural background, as well as that of others.  This results from the evaluation of historical and contemporary positions on values, practices, assumptions, and predispositions.  Encouraging active community participation and cognizance provides insight and expands students’ perspectives and awareness.



Student Learning Outcomes (SLO’s): Microbiology 2155

SLO 1. Upon completion of the course students will be able to express a basic understanding of the microbial world and its impact on you.

-Students will be able to list several ways in which microbes affect our lives.

-Students will be able to recognize the system of scientific nomenclature that uses two names: a genus and a specific epithet.

-Students will be able to differentiate the major characteristics of each group of microorganism.

-Students will be able to list the three domains.

-Students will be able to match the important historical figure to their contribution to the field of microbiology.

-Students will be able to compare spontaneous generation and biogenesis.

-Students will be able to list at least four (4) beneficial activities of microorganisms.

-Students will be able to define normal microbiota, resistance and emerging infectious disease.


SLO 2. Upon completion of the course students will be able to relate the structure and function of the major chemical components to living things.

-Students will be able to list several properties of water that are important to living systems.

-Students will be able to define acid, base, salt and pH.

-Students will be able to distinguish organic and inorganic compounds.

-Students will be able to identify the building blocks of carbohydrates.

-Students will be able to differentiate simple lipids, complex lipids, and steroids.

-Students will be able to identify the building blocks and structure of proteins.

-Students will be able to identify the building blocks of nucleic acids.

-Students will be able to describe the role of ATP in cellular activities.


SLO 3. Upon completion of the course students will be able to describe and apply appropriate laboratory methods for viewing and identifying microorganisms and controlling microbial growth.

-Students will be able to differentiate an acidic dye from a basic dye.

-Students will be able to explain the purpose of simple staining.

-Students will be able to list the steps in preparing a Gram stain, and describe the appearance of gram-positive and gram-negative cells after each step.

-Students will be able to follow instructions to correctly prepare simple, negative, Gram, Acid-Fast, capsule and endospore stained microorganisms and view them under oil-immersion.


SLO 4. Upon completion of the course students will be able to compare and contrast the functional anatomy of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

-Students will be able to identify the three basic shapes of bacteria.

-Students will be able to describe the structure and function of the glycocalyx.

-Students will be able to differentiate flagella, axial filaments, fimbriae, and pili.

-Students will be able to compare and contrast the cell walls of gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, acid-fast bacteria, archaea, and mycoplasmas.

-Students will be able to define simple diffusion, facilitated diffusion, osmosis, active transport, and group translocation.

-Students will be able to recognize the functions of inclusions and endospores.

-Students will be able to differentiate the flagella, cell membrane, cytoplasm, glycocalyx, and ribosomes of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

-Students will be able to describe the functions of the nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi complex, lysosomes, vacuoles, mitochondria, chloroplasts, peroxisomes, and centrosomes.


SLO 5. Upon completion of the course students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of microbial metabolism.

-Students will be able to define metabolism, and describe the fundamental differences between anabolism  and catabolism.

-Students will be able to identify the role of ATP as an intermediate between catabolism and anabolism.

-Students will be able to explain the term oxidation-reduction.

-Students will be able to identify the overall chemical reaction for aerobic cellular respiration.

-Students will be able to describe the overall chemical process, including products of glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and electron transport phosphorylation.

-Students will be able to compare and contrast aerobic and anaerobic respiration.

-Students will be able to describe the overall chemical process, including products, of fermentation.

-Students will be able to recognize the overall chemical reaction for photosynthesis and the microorganisms that use this process.


SLO 6. Upon completion of the course students will be able to express a basic understanding of microbial growth, including physical and chemical requirements for growth.

-Students will be able to classify microbes on the basis of preferred temperature range.

-Students will be able to define minimum, maximum and optimum growth temperature.

-Students will be able to explain the importance of temperature, pH, and osmotic pressure for microbial growth.

-Students will be able to explain the importance of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorous and trace elements for microbial growth.

-Students will be able to identify how microbes are classified on the basis of oxygen requirements.

-Students will be able to define colony.

-Students will be able to define bacterial growth, including binary fission.

-Students will be able to compare the phases of microbial growth, and describe their relation to generation time.


SLO 7. Upon completion of the course students will be able to describe physical and chemical methods of microbial control.

-Students will be able to define the following key terms related to microbial control: sterilization, disinfection, antisepsis, degerming, sanitization, biocide, germicide, bacteriostasis,  and asepsis.

-Students will be able to describe the effects of microbial control agents on cellular structures.

-Students will be able to compare the effectiveness of moist heat (boiling, autoclaving, pasteurization) and dry heat.

-Students will be able to describe how filtration, low temperatures, high pressure, desiccation, and osmotic pressure suppress microbial growth.

-Students will be able to list the factors related to effective disinfection.

-Students will be able to identify the methods of action and preferred uses of chemical disinfectants.


SLO 8. Upon completion of the course students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of microbial genetics.

-Students will be able to define genetics, genome, chromosome, gene, genetic code, genotype, and phenotype.

-Students will be able to describe how DNA serves as genetic information.

-Students will be able to describe the process of DNA replication.

-Students will be able to describe protein synthesis, including transcription, RNA processing, and translation.

-Students will be able to classify mutations by type.

-Students will be able to compare the mechanisms of genetic recombination in bacteria.


SLO 9. Upon completion of the course students will be able to relate practical uses for biotechnology and DNA technology to microorganisms and summarize methods for classification and identification.

-Students will be able to compare and contrast biotechnology and recombinant DNA technology.

-Students will be able to define restriction enzymes, and outline how they are used to make recombinant DNA.

-Students will be able to outline the steps in PCR, and provide an example of its use.

-Students will be able to compare and contrast classification and identification.

-Students will be able to explain the purpose of Bergey’s Manual.

-Students will be able to describe how staining and biochemical tests are used to identify bacteria.

-Students will be able to differentiate Western blotting from Southern blotting.

-Students will be able to explain how serological tests can be used to identify an unknown bacterium.


SLO 10. Upon completion of the course students will be able to relate the characteristics of the important groups of the Bacteria and Archaea to the significance of the organism.

-Students will be able to differentiate the gram-negative chemoheterotrophs.

-Students will be able to differentiate the enterics.

-Students will be able to differentiate the photosynthetic bacteria.

-Students will be able to differentiate the Low G+ C ratio bacteria.

-Students will be able to differentiate the High G+ C ratio bacteria.

-Students will be able to differentiate the Chlamydia, Spirochetes and Domain Archaea.

-Students will be able to give examples of habitats of the Archaea.

-Students will be able to identify the classification for the example species given.

-Students will be able to identify the significance of or the disease caused by an organism.


SLO 11. Upon completion of the course students will be able to identify characteristics of important groups of the Fungi, Algae, Protozoa and Helminthes and the significance of the organism. 

-Students will be able to list the defining characteristics of fungi.

-Students will be able to list the defining characteristics of the four phyla of fungi described in this chapter.

-Students will be able to identify two beneficial and two harmful effects of fungi.

-Students will be able to list the distinguishing characteristics of lichens, and describe their nutritional needs.

-Students will be able to describe the roles of the fungus and the alga in a lichen.

-Students will be able to list the defining characteristics of algae.

-Students will be able to list the outstanding characteristics of the five phyla of algae discussed in this chapter.

-Students will be able to list the defining characteristics of protozoa.

-Students will be able to describe the outstanding characteristics of the seven phyla of protozoa discussed in  this chapter, and give an example of each.

-Students will be able to list the distinguishing characteristics of parasitic helminths.

-Students will be able to list the characteristics of the two classes of parasitic platyhelminths, and give an example of each.


SLO 12. Upon completion of the course students will be able to relate the characteristics of Viruses to their ability to cause disease.

-Students will be able to differentiate a virus from a bacterium.

-Students will be able to describe the chemical and physical structure of both an enveloped and a nonenveloped virus. 

-Students will be able to define viral species.

-Students will be able to give an example of a family, genus, and common name for a virus.

-Students will be able to identify the characteristics of the viral families and the associated diseases.

-Students will be able to describe the lytic cycle of T-even bacteriophages.

-Students will be able to describe the lysogenic cycle of a bacteriophage.

-Students will be able to discuss the relationship between DNA- and RNA-containing viruses and cancer.

-Students will be able to discuss how a protein can be infectious.


SLO 13. Upon completion of the course students will be able to express a basic understanding of immunology.  

-Students will be able to differentiate innate and adaptive immunity.

-Students will be able to differentiate physical from chemical factors, and list five examples of each.

-Students will be able to classify leukocytes, and describe the different types.

-Students will be able to define phagocyte and phagocytosis.

-Students will be able to list the stages of inflammation.

-Students will be able to describe the cause and effects of fever.

-Students will be able to differentiate humoral from cellular immunity.

-Students will be able to explain the function of antibodies, and describe their structural and chemical characteristics.

-Students will be able to contrast the four types of adaptive immunity.




Evaluation/Assessment Practices

 

Assignments and Course Format:

The general format of the class will be lecture, discussion and student participation, and individual investigation in the lab.
1.         Exams: A total of four or five major examinations will be given during the semester for the lecture section of the class. Exams may include multiple choice, matching and possibly labeling sections. Each exam will be a sectional test covering material that has been lectured over since the previous exam, and the final may be comprehensive.
2.         Participation and other assignments may count as one overall grade that will be equal to a test grade.
      a.   Three (3) Article Reviews selected through the library databases. Due dates are: 2/22; 4/3; 5/3. Read the article and write no more than one page about why you chose the article, how it applies to you, what you learned from it, what you thought about it, etc. DO NOT copy or reword ANY of the article unless it is cited correctly (If you want to include some of the article, be sure to indicate that it came from the article!). I will check! Include with your write-up the printed citation.
      b.   Presentations
3.         Lab

 

 

Grade Scale:

Average                       Letter Grade                To Figure Overall Average:
90% and above                        A                                             Exam Average X .75
80%-89%                                B                                        +   Lab Average X .25    
70%-79%                                C                                             Final Average
60%-69%                                D
59% and below                       F

 

Grading Policies:

 

-The lowest of the regular lecture exam grades may be dropped (this includes the assignment grade but excludes the final). Lecture tests (including the participation/assignment grade) will make up 75% of the total grade.
- Lab will make up 25% of the total grade. 


           

 

Expectations:

                -All assignments must be turned in on the due date.  Assignments not received on time will not receive a full score. All students are responsible for making sure assignments are turned in on time.
     -Students are expected to take tests at the time they are scheduled.  A student that cannot make the exam at the time it is scheduled must contact the instructor prior to missing the test to be able to make that exam up.  Arrangements can be made for "special" occasions which are under the discretion of the instructor. All tests must be made up before the week of finals (no make-up tests will be given the week of finals).  No curve or bonus will be given on any make-up exam.  Lab tests or lab assignments will not be made up.

            Attendance:

            Responsibility for attending class rests upon the student. Attendance in class is expected and will be recorded. Each faculty member will determine his or her attendance policy which may require between 75 - 90 percent attendance for credit in the course.

Punctual and regular class attendance is expected of all students enrolled at Carl Albert State College. A student is expected to attend every class and laboratory for which he or she has registered. Each instructor will make known to the student his or her policy with respect to absences in the course. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of this policy. Being prepared for class in advance and participating on a regular basis is a vitally important ingredient for academic success.

At the beginning of each semester, every instructor will distribute a course syllabus and clearly state his or her attendance policy. It is the student's responsibility to inquire of the instructor if there are questions.

It is also the responsibility of the student to consult with his/her instructors when an absence must be excused. Instructors are given the prerogative of determining the excusableness of student absences except absences for school-sponsored activities and legally required jury duty, which shall be deemed excusable.

A student is also responsible for all class work covered during his/her absence from class, even in classes in which he/she is able to satisfy the instructor that the absence was unavoidable.

Failure to attend class regularly may result in a recommendation for the student to withdraw from class or from College. Students who cease attending a class but do not withdraw from that class will receive a grade of F for the course. Attendance will be taken in each class at Carl Albert State College each time that class meets.

Additional Course Information:

Additional Supplies: Scantrons, #2 lead pencils, 3-ring binder, colored pencils or pens, paper

Course Calendar.

TENTATIVE Spring 2018 Microbiology Schedule:

Date

Chapter

Exam

Lab

1/16-19

1

 

Lab set-up, Safety

1/22-26

1,2

 

1-1 hand washing, 3-1 microscope

1/29-2/2

3,4

 

1-3 aseptic techniques; 2-1 ubiquity

2-5-9

4, review

 

3-4 simple Stains; 3-5 negative stain

2/12-16

5

1 (1-4)

3-6 gram stain

2/19-23

6

 

1-4 streak plate method

2/26-3/2

7

 

3-9 spore stain; 3-7 acid fast stain

3/5-9

8

2 (5-7)

3-8 capsule stain

3/12-16

9-10

 

2-11 UV light

3/19-23

Spring Break

 

 

3/26-30

Easter Break

3 (8-10)

 

4/2-6

11

 

 

7-2 antimicrobials, 2-12 chemicals

4/9-13

12

 

 

4/16-20

Review

4 (11-12)

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (7-3)

4/23-27

13

 

Knowns & Unknowns

4/30-5/4

13, 16

 

Epidemic Simulation (7-4)

5/7-11

17, review

 

 

5/14-18

Final

Final (13, 16,17)

 

*Days off: Spring Break 3/19-23; Easter Break 3/29-30

 

ĉ
Brook Wiersig,
Jan 12, 2018, 9:42 AM
ĉ
Brook Wiersig,
Aug 11, 2017, 7:33 AM
ĉ
Brook Wiersig,
Jan 12, 2018, 9:42 AM
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