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Physiology

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Mission: To provide affordable, accessible, and exceptional education that fosters student success

Term:  Spring 2018

Course:    ZOO 2114   Human Physiology

Delivery Format:  Traditional

Instructor Information:

Name:  Brook Wiersig

Email:  bwiersig@carlalbert.edu

Office Location:  RC 304

Preferred Contact Method:   e-mail

Office Phone:  918-647-1417

Office Hours:  As posted

 

Textbook Information: Required

1.    Fox, Stuart Ira;  Human Physiology 14th edition, McGraw Hill Publishing.  

2.    Lab manual

Course Description:

Why should you want to study human physiology? The course catalog explains that this course examines the functions of the human body systems in maintaining the ultimate goal, homeostasis. EVERYTHING you do, from sleeping to eating to thinking to moving creates cause-and-effect sequences within your body. In this course, you will get to explore how the human body (including your own!) accomplishes particular tasks essential for life. Better understanding these processes and mechanisms can really give you a sense of awe and appreciation for the complexity of life! In addition, this course will lay an essential foundation for whatever health career pathway you choose. I am super excited to learn more about human body function and hope you develop an appreciation for learning more about this subject, too!

 

Prerequisites: CHEM 1115, or CHEM 1025 for nursing majors. 3 hours Theory, 2 hours Laboratory

Credit Hours:  4.00 Credits

 

General Education Outcomes:

Demonstrate knowledge-

•          Demonstration of knowledge results from the appraisal of knowledge and practice of core concepts through analytical, practical, or creative means.  Students shall assemble evidence; identify, categorize, and distinguish among ideas, concepts, and theories; and relate and analyze the significant uses of the gathered knowledge.

Think Critically-

•          Critical thinking encompasses the abilities to identify, categorize, synthesize, and distinguish ideas, concepts, theories, and approaches.  The presentation, explanation, and analysis of skills acquired in academic settings allow examination of competing hypotheses and non-academic events in light of acquired knowledge and relate the implications of cultural and social perspectives.

Communicate Effectively-

•          Effective communication results from the presentation and expression of concepts encountered in an academic setting in a clear, error-free manner both verbally and in written explanation.  Critical aspects are the clear expression of competing hypotheses and perspectives in response to material read, analyzed, or presented in both academic and non-academic settings.

Practice Global and Civil Awareness-

•          Practicing global and civil awareness creates the ability to understand both the student’s own civic and cultural background as well as that of others.  This results from the evaluation of historical and contemporary positions on values, practices, assumptions, and predispositions.  Encouraging active community participation and cognizance provides insight and expands students’ perspectives and awareness.

 

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

SLO 1. Upon completion of the course will be able to discuss mechanisms of homeostasis.

-Students will be able to define homeostasis.

-Students will be able to list the components of a feedback loop and explain the function of each.

-Students will be able to compare and contrast positive and negative feedback in terms of the relationship between stimulus and response.

-Students will be able to explain why negative feedback is the most commonly used mechanism to maintain homeostasis in the body.

-Students will be able to provide an example of a negative feedback loop that utilizes the nervous system to relay information.

-Students will be able to provide an example of a negative feedback loop that utilizes the endocrine system to relay information.

-Students will be able to provide an example of a positive feedback loop in the body.

SLO 2. Upon completion of the course students will be able to assess the role of cellular respiration.

-Students will be able to describe the processes of glycolysis.

-Students will be able to describe the principal reactants and products of each major step in glucose oxidation.

-Students will be able to describe the processes of protein catabolism and anabolism.

-Students will be able to summarize the overall process of the beta oxidation of fatty acids and explain how it relates to ketogenesis, and ketoacidosis.

-Students will be able to state the overall reaction for glucose catabolism.

-Students will be able to explain where and how cells produce ATP.

-Students will be able to predict the metabolic conditions that would favor each of the following processes: glycogenesis, glycogenolysis, and gluconeogenesis.

SLO 3. Upon completion of the course students will be able to evaluate mechanisms for movement of materials across cell membranes.

-Students will be able to describe the structure of the plasma membrane.

-Students will be able to explain what is meant by a selectively permeable membrane.

-Students will be able to describe how proteins are distributed in a cell membrane, and explain their functions.

-Students will be able to explain the composition and functions of the glycocalyx that coats cell surfaces.

-Students will be able to define osmolarity and tonicity and explain their importance.

-Students will be able to describe the effects of hypertonic, isotonic, and hypotonic conditions on cells.

-Students will be able to give examples of membrane transport processes in the human body.

-Students will be able to discuss the energy requirements and, if applicable, the sources of energy for membrane transport processes.

SLO 4. Upon completion of the course students will be able to compare and contrast neurotransmitters and their roles in synaptic transmission.

-Students will be able to define excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) and inhibitory postsynaptic potential (IPSP).

-Students will be able to give examples of neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and describe their actions.

-Students will be able to explain how stimulation of a neuron causes a local electrical response in its membrane.

-Students will be able to discuss the relationship between a neurotransmitter and its receptor.

-Students will be able to describe the events of synaptic transmission in proper chronological order.

-Students will be able to explain how a neuron "decides" whether or not to generate action potentials.

-Students will be able to interpret graphs showing the voltage vs. time relationship of an action potential.

SLO 5. Upon completion of the course students will be able to explain mechanisms of the CNS and ANS.

-Students will be able to describe reflex responses in terms of the major structural and functional components of a reflex arc.

-Students will be able to propose how specific reflexes would be used in clinical assessment of nervous system function.

-Students will be able to explain the significance of the brain barrier system.

-Students will be able to discuss the functional differences between the right and left cerebral hemispheres.

-Students will be able to explain how the two divisions of the autonomic nervous system differ in general function.

-Students will be able to discuss the relationship of the adrenal glands to the sympathetic nervous system.

-Students will be able to differentiate between cholinergic and adrenergic nerve fibers and discuss the physiological interactions of transmitters released by these neurons with specific cholinergic and adrenergic receptor subtypes.

-Students will be able to describe major parasympathetic and/or sympathetic physiological effects on target organs.

SLO 6. Upon completion of the course students will be able to identify functional roles of the major hormones produced by the body.

-Students will be able to compare and contrast how the nervous and endocrine systems control body function, with emphasis on the mechanisms by which the controlling signals are transferred through the body and the time course of the response(s) and action(s).

-Students will be able to describe the roles of negative and positive feedback in controlling hormone release.

-Students will be able to list the hormones released during short-term stress and describe the hormonal action.

-Students will be able to predict factors or situations affecting the endocrine organs that could disrupt homeostasis.

-Students will be able to briefly describe some common disorders of pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, and adrenal function.

-Students will be able to describe how hormones are synthesized and transported to their target organs.

-Students will be able to explain how the pituitary is controlled by the hypothalamus and its target organs.

SLO 7. Upon completion of the course students will be able to compare and contrast the functions of skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle.

-Students will be able to describe the major functions of muscle tissue.

-Students will be able to describe the ways that muscles work in groups to aid, oppose, or moderate each other's actions.

-Students will be able to explain the sliding filament theory of muscle contraction.

-Students will be able to describe the function of each of the contractile, regulatory, and structural protein components of a sarcomere.

-Students will be able to distinguish between two physiological types of muscle fibers, and explain their functional roles.

-Students will be able to describe the physiological properties that all muscle types have in common.

-Students will be able to relate the unique properties of smooth muscle to its locations and functions.

-Students will be able to describe the structural and physiological differences between cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle.

SLO 8. Upon completion of the course students will be able to predict homeostatic imbalance related to the cardiovascular system.

-Students will be able to describe the functions and major components of the circulatory system.

-Students will be able to name and describe the types, causes, and effects of RBC excesses and deficiencies.

-Students will be able to discuss the types, causes, and effects of leukocyte excesses and deficiencies.

-Students will be able to describe some disorders of blood clotting.

-Students will be able to describe the body’s mechanisms for controlling bleeding.

-Students will be able to explain what happens to blood clots when they are no longer needed.

SLO 9. Upon completion of the course students will be able to identify functions of the respiratory system.

-Students will be able to explain how each of the following affect pulmonary ventilation - bronchiolar smooth muscle contractions, lung and thoracic wall compliance and recoil, and pulmonary surfactant and alveolar surface tension.

-Students will be able to describe the factors that govern gas exchange in the lungs and systemic capillaries.

-Students will be able to explain how the respiratory system relates to other body systems to maintain homeostasis.

-Students will be able to describe the mechanisms of transporting O2 and CO2.

-Students will be able to contrast the composition of inspired and alveolar air.

-Students will be able to discuss how partial pressure affects gas transport by the blood.

-Students will be able to discuss the effect of blood gases and pH on the respiratory rhythm.

SLO 10. Upon completion of the course students will be able to discuss factors regulating and altering mechanisms of the urinary system.

-Students will be able to name the major nitrogenous wastes and identify their sources.

-Students will be able to describe how the renal tubules reabsorb useful solutes from the glomerular filtrate and return them to the blood.

-Students will be able to describe the process by which the kidney filters the blood plasma, including the relevant cellular structure of the glomerulus.

-Students will be able to describe how the nervous system, hormones, and the nephron itself regulate filtration.

-Students will be able to describe how the tubules secrete solutes from the blood into the tubular fluid.

-Students will be able to explain how the collecting duct and antidiuretic hormone regulate the volume and concentration of urine.

-Students will be able to describe the composition and volume of urine.

SLO 11. Upon completion of the course students will be able to evaluate the metabolic role of the digestive system.

-Students will be able to distinguish between mechanical and chemical digestion.

-Students will be able to describe how each major class of nutrients is chemically digested, name the enzymes involved, and discuss the functional differences among these enzymes.

-Students will be able to explain how the stomach produces hydrochloric acid and pepsin.

-Students will be able to describe the three phases of gastric function and how gastric activity is activated and inhibited.

-Students will be able to describe the digestive secretions and functions of the liver, gallbladder, and pancreas.

-Students will be able to describe how each type of nutrient is absorbed by the small intestine.

-Students will be able to explain the neurological control of defecation.

 

Evaluation/Assessment Practices:

Assignments and Course Format:

1.         Exams: A total of six (6) major examinations will be given during the semester for the lecture section of the class. Exams may include multiple choice, matching and possibly labeling sections. Each exam will be a sectional test covering material that has been lectured over since the previous exam, and the final may be comprehensive.

2.         Assignments and class participation may count as one overall grade that will be equal to a test grade.

3.         Lab

During class, we will generally have lecture and discussion as well as occasional group activities. You will also participate in group activities in lab.

 

Grade Scale:

Average                   Letter Grade                       To Figure Overall Average:

90% and above                 A                          (Exam Average)(0.75) + (Lab Average)(0.25) = Final Average

80%-89%                                B                              

70%-79%                                C                                            

60%-69%                                D

59% and below                  F

 

Grading Policies:

The lowest of the regular lecture exam grades may be dropped (this includes the assignment grade but excludes the final). Lecture tests (including the participation/assignment grade) will make up 75% of the total grade.

The lowest of the lab grades may be dropped. Lab will make up 25% of the total grade. 

Bonus work will NOT be given on an individual basis.

Students are expected to take tests at the time they are scheduled.  A student that cannot make the exam at the time it is scheduled must contact the instructor prior to missing the test to be able to make that exam up.  Arrangements can be made for "special" occasions which are under the discretion of the instructor. All tests must be made up within one week of when the test was given.  No curve or bonus will be given on any make-up exam.  Lab tests or lab assignments will not be made up.

 

Expectations:The student will be responsible for reading the assigned topics before class and for participation in class discussion and activities.  Students are responsible for all outside assignments made! DO NOT work on your review questions during class!! Review questions are most useful and helpful when used outside of class to begin learning and assessing your understanding of the material.

 

Attendance:Responsibility for attending class rests upon the student. Attendance in class is expected and will be recorded. Each faculty member will determine his or her attendance policy which may require between 75 - 90 percent attendance for credit in the course.

Punctual and regular class attendance is expected of all students enrolled at Carl Albert State College. A student is expected to attend every class and laboratory for which he or she has registered. Each instructor will make known to the student his or her policy with respect to absences in the course. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of this policy. Being prepared for class in advance and participating on a regular basis is a vitally important ingredient for academic success.

At the beginning of each semester, every instructor will distribute a course syllabus and clearly state his or her attendance policy. It is the student's responsibility to inquire of the instructor if there are questions.

It is also the responsibility of the student to consult with his/her instructors when an absence must be excused. Instructors are given the prerogative of determining the excusableness of student absences except absences for school-sponsored activities and legally required jury duty, which shall be deemed excusable.

A student is also responsible for all class work covered during his/her absence from class, even in classes in which he/she is able to satisfy the instructor that the absence was unavoidable.

Failure to attend class regularly may result in a recommendation for the student to withdraw from class or from College. Students who cease attending a class but do not withdraw from that class will receive a grade of F for the course. Attendance will be taken in each class at Carl Albert State College each time that class meets

Additional Course Information:

SUPPLIES: Scantrons, #2 lead pencils, colored pencils or pens, paper

 

STUDENT CONDUCT:

1.         Tardiness: Tardiness (being late for the beginning of class) is severely frowned upon.  Class officially begins at the posted time (and according to instructor's clock).  If a student is not present at roll (which is taken at every class meeting), that student is counted as late, which can affect participation points if given. Students are expected to arrive in class on time. 

2.         Class Materials: Students are responsible for bringing necessary materials to class. Do not ask me to provide you with notes if you forget them. You are also responsible for bringing something to write with, extra paper, etc., and scantrons and pencils on test days.

3.         Cell Phones:  Phones will not need to be out during class unless otherwise indicated by the instructor. Silence phones before class and put them away or at the edge or your desk. If you check your phone during a test, I will assume you are using it to cheat and you will receive a zero for that test.

4.    Laptops, Ipads, Headphones, Ipods, etc: Should not be used or out during class.

5.    RESPECT!! Please show respect for your instructor, fellow students and your college.

    a.    Do not talk while the instructor or another student is speaking.

    b.    Do not distract other students while they are trying to listen and learn.

    c.    Put trash in the trash can. DO NOT put trash in the sinks, drawers, or cabinets of the desks.

    d.    Do not write on or vandalize desks, chairs or any other school property.

 

 

 

Spring 2018 TENTATIVE schedule:

Date

Lecture (Chapters)

Labs

1/16-19

1. Study of Body Functions

 

1/22-26

2. Chemical Composition of the body

3. Cell Structure and Genetic Control

Microscopic Examination of Cells

1/29-2/2

3. Cell Structure and Genetic Control

Test 1

Tissues and Organs

2-5-9

4. Enzymes and Energy
5. Cell Respiration and Metabolism

Referred pain

2/12-16

6. Cells and their environment

Test 2

7. The nervous system

Eyes and Vision

2/19-23

8. The Central Nervous system

9. The Autonomic Nervous system

Ears and hearing

2/26-3/2

10. Sensory Physiology

Test 3

Vestibular Apartatus

3/5-9

11. Endocrine Glands

12. Muscle

Histology of Endocrine Glands

3/12-16

13. Blood, heart and Circulation

 

Reflex Arc

3/19-23

Spring Break

 

3/26-30

14. Cardiac Output, Blood flow, Blood pressure

Easter Break

Heart Sounds

4/2-6

Test 4

15. Immune System

Blood pressure

4/9-13

16. Respiratory Physiology

Cardiovascular system and Physical fitness

4/16-20

17. Kidneys

Test 5

Pulmonary function

4/23-27

18. Digestive System

 

Total minute volume and oxygen consumption

4/30-5/4

19. Regulation of Metabolism

Histology of gastrointestinal tract, liver and pancreas

5/7-11

20. Reproduction

Ovarian cycle

5/14-18

Final, Test 6

 

Holidays and Breaks: Spring Break 3/19-23; Easter Break 3/29-30


 

ĉ
Brook Wiersig,
Jan 12, 2018, 9:44 AM
ĉ
Brook Wiersig,
Jan 12, 2018, 9:44 AM
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